FORT MYERS, Fla. -- Jose Iglesias wasn't the only well-regarded prospect who got sent back to the Minor Leagues on Tuesday.

First baseman Lars Anderson, who is knocking on the door to play in the Major Leagues but simply doesn't have an opening on the Red Sox, was also sent down.

But not after he made a very solid impression on manager Bobby Valentine.

"Great camp," Valentine said. "He added to a scouting report that we had gotten before, with his ability to drive the ball to center and left-center. He added to his resume with his ability to play left field. Even though you only saw him a little in the game, we've seen him in practice. He's a good guy on a team. On another team, he could have made the big leagues."

Anderson will probably continue to work a bit in left field at Triple-A, which could not only make him more valuable to the Red Sox, but to another team that might have interest in trading for him.

Crawford feels 'really good' about health

FORT MYERS, Fla. -- Left fielder Carl Crawford (left wrist) is gaining momentum in his quest to start getting into some games.

That said, he is still slated to start the season on the disabled list, and the Red Sox won't set a date on his potential return to the team.

"Carl and I had a talk at about seven this morning. He's going to take his swings in that cage and progress with his throwing and he's going to have 20 bunts today, somewhere on the field," said manager Bobby Valentine. "He feels really good about where he is right now."

The Red Sox are purposely being conservative with Crawford so he doesn't develop inflammation like he did earlier in camp.

"He thinks he could play in a game right now, talking to Carl," said Valentine. "He feels that good. His wrist has no problem at all. He has resided in the fact that there is a program the medical staff has him on that he's going to stay on religiously. He's been great with it."

That program will entail Crawford staying in Florida when the Red Sox head north, at least for a few days. After that, he will likely go on a Minor League rehab assignment.

Complete quartet still in rotation mix

FORT MYERS, Fla. -- Though the Red Sox have made their decision at shortstop, the battle is ongoing for the final two spots in the starting rotation.

Daniel Bard, Alfredo Aceves, Felix Doubront and Aaron Cook all remain in the mix.

Cook will pitch five innings in a Minor League game on Wednesday. Aceves gets the start in Thursday's game against the Blue Jays. Doubront will pitch in a Minor League game that day. Bard will start on Friday on the road against the Twins.

Lackey apologizes for choice of words

FORT MYERS, Fla. -- Red Sox right-hander John Lackey, who is recovering from Tommy John surgery and won't pitch in 2012, remains miffed at the criticism Boston starting pitchers received for drinking beer in the clubhouse last season.

But he now realizes he made a poor choice of words in summing up the situation in a Boston Globe article that ran on Tuesday.

"Guys having a beer after their start has been going on for the last 100 years," Lackey told the newspaper. "This is retarded. It's not like we were sitting up there doing it every night. It's not even close to what people think."

Later on Tuesday, Lackey apologized for his insensitivity.

"I apologize for my thoughtless choice of words that appeared in print earlier today," Lackey said in a statement released by the Red Sox. "I meant no harm, and I am sorry to all I offended."

The Red Sox have banned beer in the home clubhouse this season, and also on flights when they are headed back to Boston.

Does Lackey acknowledge that members of Boston's rotation -- including himself -- made a mistake by consuming alcohol in the clubhouse during games?

"I guess. Sure. They're being made in every clubhouse in the big leagues, then," Lackey said to The Globe's Dan Shaughnessy. "If we'd have made the playoffs, we'd have been a bunch of fun guys."

Red Sox co-aces Jon Lester and Josh Beckett both said earlier this spring they had lapses in judgment last season and vowed to make better decisions going forward.