The season may be over for the Athletics and Brewers after not making the playoffs, but they each have young stars who provided a more optimistic glimpse into their future during the final full month of the season.

On Tuesday, A's pitcher Brett Anderson and Brewers infielder Casey McGehee were each named Gillette Rookie of the Month for the American League and National League, respectively, thanks to their outstanding play in September.

Anderson, a 21-year-old left-hander, went 4-0 with a 2.28 ERA in four September starts. In 23 2/3 innings, he surrendered just 22 hits and three walks while striking out 26 and holding opposing batters to a .247 average.

Anderson was acquired from the D-backs as part of the Dan Haren trade in December 2007. He became just the third Oakland rookie to win at least four games in September, joining Barry Zito (five in 2000) and Mike Warren (four in 1983).

With 150 strikeouts, the second-round Draft pick in '06 set a new record for an A's rookie.

Anderson finished the season 11-11 with a 4.06 ERA in 30 starts. He led all American League rookies in strikeouts while finishing tied for second in starts, in fourth place in innings (175 1/3) and tied for fourth in wins.

"He's going to be one of the elite pitchers in the league, without a doubt," A's manager Bob Geren said recently. "He's a special young man."

McGehee finished September batting .337 (31-for-92) with five home runs. In addition, his 26 RBIs led all Major League rookies and was tied for second in the big leagues overall -- behind Ryan Howard's 27.

The 26-year-old added six doubles, 12 runs scored, a .565 slugging percentage and a .394 on-base percentage. He also collected nine multi-hit games and six multi-RBI contests. That included a 4-for-5 performance on Sept. 12 against the D-backs, when he cranked out two homers and a career-high six RBIs.

McGehee, claimed off waivers from the Cubs in October 2008, finished the year leading all National League rookies in RBIs (66) while ranking second in batting average (.301) and tied for second in home runs (16).

On Sept. 29, the Brewers announced he would undergo arthroscopic surgery to remove loose bodies in a right knee that had bothered him pretty much the entire season.

But he never let it stop him from producing.

"He spends a lot of time in the training room getting ready to play, both [pregame] and post," Brewers manager Ken Macha said recently. "That takes a toll on a person, because it's not like he can just show up and play. It shows a desire to get out there to go out and do it."