FORT MYERS, Fla. -- Before Big Papi, there was Big Mo.

And on Monday, the Red Sox announced Maurice Samuel Vaughn would headline the latest class of inductees into the club's Hall of Fame.

Joining Vaughn in the Class of 2008 are former teammate and left fielder Mike Greenwell, left-hander Bill Lee, right-handers Frank Sullivan and Wes Ferrell, shortstop Everett Scott, scout George Digby and former player development executive Ed Kenney Sr.

The chosen eight will be inducted for their outstanding contributions to the franchise, with the induction dinner scheduled for Friday, Nov. 7, at the Marriott Copley Hotel in Boston.

One of the most feared sluggers of his era, Vaughn captured the 1995 American League MVP and led the Red Sox to the AL East title that same season. He ranks sixth in club history with 230 homers in a Boston uniform. A homegrown talent that attended Seton Hall University, Vaughn played in Boston from 1991 through 1998. He signed after the '98 season with the Angels before finishing his injury-plagued career with the Mets in 2003.

Greenwell (1985-96) had a lifetime .303 batting average and played his entire big league career with the Red Sox, taking over the duties of playing in front of the Green Monster from Jim Rice. In his fourth season, Greenwell finished second to Jose Canseco in the 1988 AL MVP race.

One of the most colorful pitchers in franchise history, Lee will be inducted as record-holder for most games pitched by a left-hander (321) in team history and the third-highest win total (94) by a southpaw. He pitched in Boston between 1969 and 1978.

In addition, Ferrell (1934-37) and Scott (1914-21) were selected from the early years of the franchise.

Ferrell led the AL in wins (25) and complete games (31) in 1936, and he holds the Major League record for career homers by a pitcher with 38. Scott is the all-time Ironman in Red Sox history, playing in 832 consecutive games while taking part in three World Series championship teams (1915, '16 and '18).

The non-uniformed personnel entering the Hall of Fame are Digby and the late Kenney, who spent over 40 years as a club executive.

The 2008 inductees were selected by a committee comprised of Red Sox executives and broadcasters, media members and representatives of the New England Sports Museum and BoSox club.

The committee also selected its seventh Most Memorable Moment for Hall of Fame recognition: Ted Williams' home run in his final Major League at-bat on Sept. 28, 1960, versus the Baltimore Orioles at Fenway Park.

This is the seventh class of inductees selected since the Red Sox Hall of Fame was founded in 1995. Members have been added every other year beginning in 2000. This year's eight inductees bring membership in the club's most prestigious group to 52.