TORONTO -- Red Sox ace Curt Schilling created a blog this season so that he could better communicate with his fans, and also get his thoughts out there in an unfiltered way. But Schilling found another use for www.38pitches.com on Wednesday, when he issued a public apology to Barry Bonds for critical comments Schilling made about the Giants superstar in a radio interview a day earlier.

"Everyone has days and events in life they'd love to push the rewind button on, [Tuesday] was one of those days," wrote Schilling. "Regardless of my opinions, thoughts and beliefs on anything Barry Bonds, it was absolutely irresponsible and wrong to say what I did. I don't think it's within anyone's right to say the things I said [Tuesday] and affect other people's lives in that way."

During his weekly spot on WEEI-850 AM in Boston, Schilling was asked if fans should hold their nose as Bonds closes in on the all-time home run record.

"Oh yeah. I would think so," Schilling told hosts John Dennis and Dale Arnold. "I mean, he admitted that he used steroids. I mean, there's no gray area. He admitted to cheating on his wife, cheating on his taxes and cheating on the game, so I think the reaction around the league, the game, being what it is, in the case of what people think. Hank Aaron not being there. The Commissioner [Bud Selig] trying to figure out where to be. It's sad."

Red Sox manager Terry Francona was so uncomfortable with Schilling's comments that he addressed it with the right-hander -- who he has a great relationship with -- in a Tuesday meeting.

Overall, Francona doesn't have a problem with Schilling voicing his opinions on his weekly radio spot or his blog. But he'd like the right-hander to tone it down on some controversial issues.

"Stay away from certain things," said Francona. "It just doesn't make sense. If he wants to run for office someday and tackle the world's problems, go ahead. Just not while I'm the manager. I just think there's issues you stay away from. If media asks you something, you don't have to answer. That's just the way I feel. Everybody feels differently though and that's their right. I've been with Schill a long time. I think the world of this guy. I just told him to ease off on the gas pedal, and he will."

Schilling chose not to discuss the matter with the media on Wednesday, feeling that the blog spoke for itself. He also indicated there would be no direct apology to Bonds, who did not speak with the media Wednesday, declining a number of requests.

"That's still no excuse or reason to say what I did, or even answer the question that was asked," continued Schilling in the blog entry. "The question I was asked and the answer I gave yesterday affected a lot more people than just he and I. His wife, his children, his friends and his family were all affected by that, as were mine and my teammates.

"As someone who's made it very clear I have major issues with members of the media that take little or no pride in their work, it's the height of hypocrisy for me to say what I did, in any forum. I started this blog to give people a look into the life we live on and off the field, not to get into back and forths with people I don't like or have issues with. Doing that will only make this a rant filled no content bunch of words."

The Giants play in Boston June 15-17, at which point Bonds could be right on the cusp of passing Aaron. The way the Boston pitching rotation is set up right now, Schilling will not pitch against Bonds and the Giants.