After an exciting 1999 season, 2000 was a letdown for the Red Sox, who tried and failed to make their third consecutive postseason for the first time in franchise history. With Fenway Park's future in doubt, Red Sox CEO John Harrington declared his intentions to sell the team during the fall.

The Red Sox

Record: 85-77, 2nd in American League East
Manager: James F. Williams
Attendance: 2,586,024

The Red Sox entered the 2000 season trying to make the post-season for a third consecutive year, something they had never done before. Over the winter, the team dealt prospect Adam Everett for Houston outfielder Carl Everett and also signed Korean left-hander Sang-Hoon Lee, known for his long, orange-tinted hair.

Pedro's brother Ramon Martinez, who the club had acquired in 1999, pitched the home opener and Boston trounced Minnesota 13-4 behind home runs from each side of the plate by Everett.

The center fielder made less positive news on July 15 when he butted heads with plate umpire Ron Kulpa in an argument. Everett was suspended 10 games but still led the team in home runs (34) and RBIs (108).

Pedro Martinez towered above everyone else in 2000 and followed his spectacular 1999 with another brilliant campaign. For the second year in a row, Pedro won the Cy Young Award with a 1.74 ERA and an MLB-record 0.7373 WHIP. Derek Lowe saved 42 games in 74 relief appearances and Nomar Garciaparra won his second consecutive AL batting crown with a .372 average, the highest single-season average ever for a Red Sox right-handed hitter.

Despite these individual achievements, the Red Sox failed to qualify for the playoffs for the first time in three years. On October 6, CEO John Harrington announced that the team would be put up for sale after plans for a new Fenway Park across the street collapsed.

In December, the Red Sox signed outfielder Manny Ramirez to an eight year, $160 million deal, the largest in team history.

Renovations

In 2000, two noticeable additions were made on the roof in right field. Before the season, a Hood milk carton was installed on the right-field light tower and on September 4, 2000, the Red Sox officially retired Carlton Fisk's #27 and added his number to the right-field roof façade.

Non-Red Sox Baseball At Fenway Park

For the third time in five years the University of Massachusetts captured the Baseball Beanpot, downing Northeastern 13-8 in the championship game at Fenway Park.

2000 Non-Red Sox Baseball At Fenway Park
April 25University of Massachusetts 13, Northeastern 8 (Beanpot Championship)*
April 25Boston College 8, Harvard 5 (Beanpot Consolation)*

*Starting in 1990, Fenway Park has hosted the annual Baseball Beanpot, baseball's version of the longstanding Boston hockey tradition. Originally, the competition featured the same schools that battle for Hockey Beanpot: Boston College, Boston University, Northeastern University and Harvard University. However, when BU dropped their baseball program after the 1995 season, the University of Massachusetts took their place. The Baseball Beanpot has been held at Fenway Park every year since its inception except for in 2004 and 2010, when the tournament was played at Campanelli Stadium in Brockton, MA.

Fenway Park In 2008 (Credit: Boston Red Sox)