In February 1984, Lou Gorman took over as Red Sox General Manager and inherited a gifted young pitching staff that was starting to blossom. Also over the offseason, as the new plastic bleacher seats were installed in center-field, the Red Sox installed one red seat back to commemorate the location of the longest home run ever hit at Fenway Park, a 502-foot blast by Ted Williams on June 9, 1946. On May 28, 1984, the club also retired Williams' #9 and Joe Cronin's #4. The numbers of the two legends were the first to be retired by the Red Sox and were placed on façade of the right-field roof. In July, the United State Olympic Baseball team visited Fenway Park to play an exhibition game.

The Red Sox

Record: 86-76, 4th in American League East
Manager: Ralph G. Houk
Attendance: 1,661,618

Lou Gorman took over as general manager of the Red Sox on February 1, inheriting a skilled, homegrown pitching staff that included Bruce Hurst, Oil Can Boyd, Bob Ojeda and Al Nipper, all age 26 or younger. Added to the mix on May 15 was 21-year-old Roger Clemens, who was drafted by the Red Sox in 1983 and rocketed up through the minors.

The Red Sox played their first eight games of the 1984 season on the West Coast and were 5½ games out of first place by their home opener at Fenway Park. The Tigers raced to a 35-5 record and by May 24, Boston trailed Detroit by 16½ games.

A pair of popular Red Sox players departed in May. Suffering from knee injuries, Jerry Remy played his last game for the club on May 18. One week later, Dennis Eckersley was traded to the Cubs in exchange for Bill Buckner.

On May 28, the Red Sox officially retired Ted Williams' #9 and Joe Cronin's #4 and placed them on the façade of the right-field roof. They were the first numbers retired by the franchise.

Though the team couldn't keep pace with Detroit, the season was not devoid of exciting moments. On June 28, Dwight Evans completed the cycle by hitting a walk-off, three-run home run in the bottom of the 11th inning.

Tony Armas led the American League with 43 home runs, 123 RBIs, and 339 total bases. With only 32 bases on balls, Armas' his 11 more home runs than he received free passes and that differential remains the largest in history.

Renovations

In 1984, Haywood Sullivan, commemorated a lone red seat amongst over 6,000 other green bleacher seats. The red seat (Section 42, Row 37, Seat 21) marked the location of the longest home run ever hit in Fenway Park, a 502-foot blast by Red Sox slugger Ted Williams on June 9, 1946.

In addition to recognizing Williams' historic feat, the Red Sox also honored his entire career when they officially retired his #9 along with Joe Cronin's #4 in a ceremony on May 28, 1984. The two legends' numbers were the first to be retired by the Red Sox and were placed on the façade of the right-field roof.

Non-Red Sox Baseball At Fenway Park

The 1984 United States Olympic Baseball team trounced a team of Park League All-Stars 17-2 at Fenway Park on July 6, 1984. The US team's roster included future MLB stars Will Clark, Barry Larkin, Mark McGwire and B.J. Surhoff, and would go on to lose in that summer's Gold Medal game to Japan's team.

1984 Non-Red Sox Baseball At Fenway Park
May 27Old-Timers Game
July 6U. S. Olympic Baseball team 17, Park League All-Stars 2

Fenway Park In 1982 (Credit: Boston Red Sox)