The 1950 Red Sox scored runs by the truckload but despite winning 94 games, they finished third in the league. Fenway Park also hosted many amateur baseball and football games in 1950.

The Red Sox

Record: 94-60, 3rd in American League
Manager: Joseph V. McCarthy (31-28), Stephen F. O'Neill (63-32)
Attendance: 1,344,080

After two disappointing seasons that went down to the wire, the 1950 Red Sox had one of the most potent lineups in history and scored 1,027 runs. In two early June games at Fenway Park, the Red Sox scored a record 49 times, annihilating the St. Louis Browns by scores of 20-4 and 29-4.

Utilityman Billy Goodman led the league in hitting with a .354 average, but only after Johnny Pesky (who hit .312 himself) unselfishly volunteered to ride the bench so that Goodman could collect enough at-bats to qualify. AL Rookie of the Year Walt Dropo and Vern Stephens tied for the league lead in RBIs with 144 apiece and Dom DiMaggio led the AL in stolen bases. Ultimately, the team's pitching held the club back, though no Boston hurler finished with a losing record.

Goodman played every position in both the infield and the outfield, though his opportunity to play so often came after a broken elbow that Ted Williams suffered in the 1950 All-Star Game. In 1950, Williams drove in 97 runs but played in just 89 games.

Despite the prolific production, manager Joe McCarthy suffered a stretch where his team lost 11 of 13 games. On June 23, McCarthy he resigned citing physical exhaustion. Steve O'Neill took his place and led the team back into contention, with Williams returning in mid-September. The Red Sox closed to within a game and a half of the AL lead but ultimately finished in third place, four games behind the pennant-winning Yankees.

Non-Red Sox Baseball At Fenway Park

In preparation for the 1950 College World Series, the first held in Omaha, Nebraska, the Tufts College baseball team held a night workout at Fenway Park in June 1950. The following month, the Mayor's Charity Field Day included a match-up between the New England Hoboes (a novelty team) and Philadelphia Colored All-Stars that ended in a 3-3 tie before more than 27,000 spectators. Among the players on Philadelphia's roster was the legendary Satchel Paige. The month of July also featured the return of the William Randolph Hearst Sandlot Tournament, an all-scholastic affair that had been played at Braves Field and Fallon Field the previous two years. A Hearst doubleheader on July 22 was followed by another Hearst game in August.

1950 Non-Red Sox Baseball At Fenway Park
June 12Tufts College Baseball Team Workout
July 11Mayor's Charity Field Day: New England Hoboes 3, Philadelphia Colored All-Stars 3*
July 22William Randolph Hearst Sandlot Tournament: Records 12, Americans 2
July 22William Randolph Hearst Sandlot Tournament: Americans 7, Records 2
August 13St. Anthony's (Everett) 20, St. Theresa's (West Roxbury) 1 (CYO Game)

*For many years, the City of Boston regularly held a summertime Mayor's Charity Field Day. Many of these field days took place at Fenway Park, with a variety of sports, games, activities and other amusements for the crowds. In certain years, the Mayor's Charity Field Day even included an abbreviated baseball game at Fenway Park that was usually played between local teams.

More Than a Ballpark™

Boston University's football team dropped their first two games at Fenway Park in 1950 but rallied to win two of its next three at the ballpark, including a 41-13 trouncing of New York University.

1950 Non-Baseball Events At Fenway Park
July 11Mayor's Charity Field Day*
October 13St. Bonaventure 25, Boston University 21 (Football)
October 28Syracuse 13, Boston University 7 (Football)
November 4Boston University 16, William & Mary 14 (Football)
November 11Boston University 41, New York University 13 (Football)
November 18University of Idaho 26, Boston University 19 (Football)

*For many years, the City of Boston regularly held a summertime Mayor's Charity Field Day. Many of these field days took place at Fenway Park, with a variety of sports, games, activities and other amusements for the crowds. In certain years, the Mayor's Charity Field Day even included an abbreviated baseball game at Fenway Park that was usually played between local teams.

The Red Sox during the National Anthem in 1951 (Credit: Leslie Jones Collection/Boston Public Library)